Psychotherapy (Psychodynamic Counseling)

Psychotherapy is a collaborative process in which a therapist and client examine and modify patterns that govern their lives. As creatures of habit, people are perpetually drawn to what is familiar, comfortable, and safe. As children, we observe and mirror the thinking and behavior of those closest to us. This new information then instructs us in how to interpret and interact with the world around us. We follow these patterns of thinking and behavior, regardless as to whether they are destructive or self-destructive. Since this experience is all we know, we believe everyone thinks like we do, and behaves in the same way, too. As we get older, we sometimes experience an awakening, in which we see that not everyone was brought up in the same way… and, not everyone subscribes to the same beliefs, or acts in the same manner. Once we begin to see that we can live differently, we are more inclined to examine ourselves… to evaluate what is working for us, and what is an impedance. As much as we are drawn to remain in the system we grew up in, we also want to overcome restriction and conflict. However, we most often reenact patterns, despite our best efforts. In order to change patterns, we must decode them, process them, and develop insight to help us modify our thinking and behavior. Doing so involves different levels of exploration and practice. Psychotherapy is arguably one of the most effective ways to interrupt and modify patterns so as to create organic, lasting change.

Psychotherapy is used for:

Mood disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Substance Abuse, Ego Strength Deficits, ADD/ADHD, Crisis, Family IssuesMarital Issues